Using the Mahout Naive Bayes Classifier to automatically classify Twitter messages

mahout2Classification algorithms can be used to automatically classify documents, images, implement spam filters and in many other domains. In this tutorial we are going to use Mahout to classify tweets using the Naive Bayes Classifier. The algorithm works by using a training set which is a set of documents already associated to a category. Using this set, the classifier determines for each word, the probability that it makes a document belong to each of the considered categories. To compute the probability that a document belongs to a category, it multiplies together the individual probability of each of its word in this category.  The category with the highest probability is the one the document is most likely to belong to.

To get more details on how the Naive Bayes Classifier is implemented, you can look at the mahout wiki page.

This tutorial will give you a step-by-step description on how to create a training set, train the Naive Bayes classifier and then use it to classify new tweets.

Read more of this post

Playing with HazelCast, a distributed datagrid on Amazon EC2 with jclouds-cli

datagridHazelcast is an open-source in-memory datagrid that allows to store data in memory distributed across a cluster of servers and to execute distributed tasks. It can be used as an in-memory database that can be queried using SQL-like queries or any filter that you can implement in Java. To prevent data loss, data in memory can be backed by a persistent storage (file, relational database, NoSQL database, …). Data can be persisted synchronously when the data are written to the in-memory database (write through) or asynchronously to batch the writes (write behind).

In applications which are read and write intensive, relying on a relational database server (or a master/slaves configuration) can be very inefficient as it often becomes a bottleneck and a single point of failure. With data in memory, reads and writes are very fast and as data is distributed and replicated there is no single point of failure. Indeed, if we consider a replication factor of 3, we have a primary and 2 backups nodes so if one node of the cluster were to go down, other nodes of the network can take over and get reassigned the data. In the catastrophic event where the database goes down, writes in the cache are queued in a log file so the writes can be persisted in the database once it is backed up.

There are other products offering similar features than Hazelcast:

  • Oracle Coherence: it is a very robust and popular data grid solution used by many financial companies and systems having to deal with a lot of transaction. It also has an active community.
  • VMWare Gemfire: It is used by some financial companies and provides most of the features Coherence has but the community is much smaller so it’s harder to find documentation.
  • GigaSpaces XAP: The system provides a lot of features. It allows among other things to dynamically instantiate services on multiple servers and handles services failover.

In this tutorial we are going to deploy hazelcast on an EC2 cluster. Then we will run some operations in the datagrid and finally we will stop the cluster.

Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: